Facts Every Baseball Fan Should Know

This topic contains 11 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  Taegu JPN 6 years, 6 months ago.

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  • #2088
     Taegu JPN 
    Spectator

    Inspired by Josh Hamilton’s 4 HR performance, I went to see how times this had been done – Hamilton is only the 16th player to accomplish this feat in the history of MLB.

    As it turns out, the 4 HR achievement is even more rare than the perfect game, which has occurred 21 times #whodathunk

    So on the wikipedia Perfect Game page, it notes:

    Although it is possible for multiple pitchers to combine for a perfect game (as has happened nine times at the major league level for a no-hitter), to date, every major league perfect game has been thrown by a single pitcher.

    I would have thought that at least once a couple of pitchers had combined for a perfect game, just by probability.

    Anyway, I thought the above tidbits were interesting and worth sharing. Post any other cool trivia here that you come across, we’re all baseball nerds at heart and should appreciate it!

  • #17146
     Toluca KOR 
    Spectator

    There was a sorta perfect game once by Babe Ruth….

    Starting pitcher walked (I think) the first batter, got ejected, then Babe came in and picked off the runner and retired the next 26 in order.

  • #17147
     Taegu JPN 
    Spectator

    Wasn’t Babe the starter in that game, and subsequently the one ejected? Could be wrong on that.

    It’s hard to believe we are coming up on the 100th anniversary of Babe’s rookie year (1914)… What I’d give to have a time machine…

  • #17148
     Santiago de Cuba USA 
    Spectator

    I thought it was interesting that the only player to get more total bases in one game was Shawn Green, clearly one of the all-time greats. I didn’t realize it until I looked, but Green is #100 on the all-time home run list with 328 for his career.

  • #22612
     Changsha JPN 
    Spectator

    Pat Venditte is a switch pitcher, capable of pitching proficiently with both arms. He is recognized as the only active professional pitcher who is able to do this.
    youtube video up against a switch hitter
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yDyCRTlKllk

  • #22619
     Taegu JPN 
    Spectator

    haha, I’ve thought about that before, wondering why that hasn’t happened. it would seem to be a valuable trait. c’mon OOTP15, let’s see switch pitchers!

  • #22623
     Moca DOM 
    Spectator

    Pretty amazing that he is that proficient from both arms.

    I wonder what the official rule is.

  • #22631
     Hong Kong CUB 
    Spectator

    Reading the Wikipedia page, seems there was no official rule. They had to make one up to deal with people switching back and forth. Basically the batter and pitcher have to commit their intentions, one pitch has to be thrown, and then each can switch once during the plate appearance if they want.

    I was thinking about baseball sims like OOTP and others, and this guy. Every baseball sim I’ve ever seen has been structured to have pitchers stuck as one or the other. I wonder if anyone will bother modeling this in a game.

  • #22634
     Toluca KOR 
    Spectator

    The Phillies used to have a guy that did this, though I am not sure if it ever happened in the middle of an at-bat. Not even sure if it ever happened in a real game, though I think it did. I do remember that Mizuna (sp?) made a special glove for him, that had the webbing in the middle, so he could wear it on either hand.

    His name was Greg Harris, but there were two guys pitching in the bigs with that name at the time, I think he was Greg W. Harris.

  • #22654
     Mexico City DOM 
    Spectator

    Pablo Sandoval is know to throw as well left-handed as right, and has claimed he wants to pitch someday and do the switch thing. Here’s his just throwing lefty… I swear I saw a video showing him playing 3rd lefty and making the throw across the diamond….

    Pablo Throws Lefty

  • #22670
     Hong Kong CUB 
    Spectator

    @Toluca (USA) wrote:

    The Phillies used to have a guy that did this, though I am not sure if it ever happened in the middle of an at-bat. Not even sure if it ever happened in a real game, though I think it did. I do remember that Mizuna (sp?) made a special glove for him, that had the webbing in the middle, so he could wear it on either hand.

    His name was Greg Harris, but there were two guys pitching in the bigs with that name at the time, I think he was Greg W. Harris.

    I think it was Greg A. Harris, actually. He only pitched with both arms in one inning, right at the end of his career, when he was with the Expos. Probably let him do it because he was going to retire or something.

  • #23437
     Taegu JPN 
    Spectator

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pete_Browning
    Pretty funny read. Pete Browning was the inspiration for the Louisville Slugger bat.

    I feel you, Pete – I am the same when it comes to dancing:

    Playing in spite of serious medical afflictions which rendered him virtually deaf and subjected him to massive headaches, he resorted to alcohol to subdue the pain, but continued to hit well even as his drinking increased

    Browning was tormented for his entire life by mastoiditis, a serious infection of the inner ear usually contracted during childhood, which can result in deafness, vertigo, facial palsy, and brain damage. As a result, he lost his hearing at a young age, and was faced with frequent bouts of crippling head pain. The deafness had led Browning to drop out of school at an early age, so that he went through life as a virtual illiterate, and in order to deaden the physical pain resulting from his condition, he began drinking heavily in his youth. The drinking quickly spiraled out of control; he often appeared on the field while drunk, and was suspended for the final two months of the 1889 season for drunkenness, along with other shorter suspensions at different times. He was unable to stop, however, frequently stating, “I can’t hit the ball until I hit the bottle

    Pretty crazy – I won’t bore anyone with the story, but we just “happened to figure out” that my [at the time] one year old son had mastoiditis.

    This literally made me laugh out loud

    Browning was a man of eccentric personal habits, particularly in relation to his bats. He spoke to them, and gave each one a name, often that of a Biblical figure. In the belief that any individual bat contained only a certain number of hits, he would periodically “retire” bats, keeping vast numbers of the retired ones in the home he shared with his mother. These bats were 37 inches long and 48 ounces in weight, enormous even by the standards of the time. He also habitually stared at the sun, thinking that by doing so, he would strengthen his eyes. He also “cleansed” his eyes when travelling by train by sticking his head out the window in an effort to catch cinders in them. Browning also computed his average on his cuffs on a regular basis, and was not above announcing to all when his train arrived at a depot that he was the champion batter of the American Association

    A REAL MAN’S MAN
    😆

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